Dick Bartley

_bartleyRadio Hall of Famer Dick Bartley hosts the nation’s best All-Request Saturday
Night Oldies Party. It’s “Rock and Roll’s Greatest Hits”. Then, spend your
Sunday morning with Dick Bartley as he hosts the classic countdown show
“American Gold”.

Bartley began his radio career at WWOD in Lynchburg, Virginia, in 1969. He spent his college years immersed in radio at the University of Virginia, joining WELK as a full-time broadcaster upon graduation in 1973. Two years later, Bartley moved to Chicago as a programmer of WBBM-FM and later WFYR-FM.

Dick Bartley’s network career began in 1982, when his top-rated Chicago oldies program was picked up by the new RKO Radio Networks.

Solid Gold Saturday Night quickly became a national sensation and was soon
joined by Solid Gold Scrapbook. Morning drive time at WNSR-FM/New York followed in 1987. Bartley signed with Westwood One Radio Networks in 1988, where he created, produced and hosted the Rock & Roll Oldies Show, as well as the breakthrough daily feature New Gold on CD.

A member of the ABC Radio Networks’ talent line-up since 1991, Bartley currently writes, produces and hosts American Gold the classic oldies countdown show, and Rock & Roll’s Greatest Hits the live, Saturday night, oldies request party.

Dick Bartley was inducted into the Radio Hall of Fame in 2000


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