News

FAA changes rules; cell phones, tablets cleared for takeoff

FAA changes rules; cell phones, tablets cleared for takeoff

CLEARED FOR TAKEOFF: A United Airlines jet departs in view of the air traffic control tower at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport. The FAA has loosened rules allowing passengers to use electronic devices in flight. Photo: Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — Government safety rules are changing to let airline passengers use most electronic devices from gate-to-gate.

The change will let passengers read, work, play games, watch movies and listen to music.

The Federal Aviation Administration says airlines can allow passengers to use the devices during takeoffs and landings on planes that meet certain criteria for protecting aircraft systems from electronic interference.

Most new airliners are expected to meet the criteria, but changes won’t happen immediately. Timing will depend upon the airline.

Connections to the Internet to surf, exchange emails, text or download data will still be prohibited below 10,000 feet.

Heavier devices like laptops will have to be stowed. Passengers will be told to switch their smartphones, tablets and other devices to airplane mode.

And cellphone calls will still be prohibited.

Recent Headlines

in Sports

Star sprinter Torrin Lawrence dies at 25

Fresh
FILE - In this June 20, 2013 file photo, Torrin Lawrence reacts after his heat in the senior men's 400-meter dash at the U.S. Championships athletics meet in Des Moines, Iowa. Former University of Georgia 400-meter runner Torrin Lawrence died in a car accident early Monday, July 28, 2014 in Cordele, Ga. He was 25.

Celebrated track star Torrin Lawrence has been killed in a tragic road accident in Georgia.

in Local

VanderPol Dragline Wins VFW Demolition Bid

demolition

The demolition is expected to start on Monday.

in Viral Videos

Mini Dominoes break World Record

Mini Dominoes

The challenge gets bigger as the Dominoes get smaller!

in Lifestyle

Fist bumps relay 90 percent less germs than handshakes

President Barack Obama fist bumps the cashier after paying for his order at Franklin Barbecue in Austin, Texas on July 10, 2014.

Replacing handshakes with fist bumps could help cut down on the spread of bacteria and illnesses, according to a new study.